Tag Archives: Rainbow Trout

Trolling Big Rainbow Trout – Video

A video my good friend Jimmy from Rawr fishing put together from back on Memorial Day weekend with Rob S. and myself. It was Jimmy’s first time trolling out on Round Valley, and boy did we spoil him! Despite the fact we had a rough start to our day and got out super late, we put somewhere around 2 dozen Rainbows in the boat, including three Round Valley Trout Association tagged Trophy Trout!

July Fishing Report

Been fishing the Valley a lot the past few weeks with Rob S. and Dan P. and the fishing has been on fire! Landed 2 trophy tagged Rainbows during the RVTA Open tournament 2 weeks ago, Rob S. Caught his first tagged Rainbow with me a few days prior as well. Lake Trout fishing has been pretty good and had a few days with over 10 Lake Trout in the boat the past week. To top it all off we caught and released a trophy tagged Brown Trout this morning. Visit the Round Valley Fishing Facebook Page to see all the pics and get involved our community there.

– Zach Merchant

Zach Merchant holding Rainbow Trout
Zach Merchant holds a nice size Rainbow Trout caught trolling in the early hours one fine July summer day.

Shore Fishing 101 – Slip Bobber Rigs

In my last “shore fishing 101” article we covered bait selection for fishing the shoreline of Round Valley for Trout, so I’m going to continue to cover the basics in this article by explaining the proper way to use a slip bobber while fishing from the shoreline.  Now, there are two basic rigs that I use when I’m fishing the shoreline for Trout, slip bobbers and slip sinker rigs; however I will be covering slip sinker rigs in my next article. Both of these rigs are simple and will produce a lot of fish if used properly.

Slip Bobbers
Slip Bobbers come in all kinds of shapes, sizes, materials, and rigging options.

Why Use a Slip Bobber?

The slip bobber rig will allow you to suspend your bait at virtually any depth you want, while still allowing for easy casting. If you’ve ever tried to cast a traditional bobber setup with the hook any more than three feet away from your bobber you know it gets awkward to impossible.

When to Use a Slip Bobber?

In the hot summer months, trout go deep in search of cool water and your bait presentation is typically on the bottom. In the Fall, Winter, and Spring trout start moving around more in search of their comfort zone and it’s easiest to find that zone with a slip bobber.

Materials

To start out fishing with slip bobbers, you will need a fairly short, as well as cheap, list of tackle to set up your rig;

  • A small barrel swivel
  • Slip bobber (make sure it’s big enough to prevent your live bait from pulling it under)
  • Bobber stop (typically a small plastic tube with thread spooled around it, some also come with beads)
  • Small egg sinker or split shot
  • Size #6 or #8 bait holder or circle hook
  • Approximately 12-inch long fluorocarbon leader (Maximum 8-lb test)

Rigging the Slip Bobber

Visualize how the completed setup will look: hook > leader > swivel > sinker > bobber > bead > bobber stop > rod > reel > you!

Slip Bobber Rig
A complete slip bobber rig consists of a hook > leader > swivel > sinker > bobber > bead > bobber stop .

1. Start putting this rig together by opening the bail on your reel and threading your fishing line through the plastic tube of the bobber stop. The plastic tube needs to come off so it’s important to do this now before you forget. Slide the thread off the tube and gently pull the tag ends so you get a nice looking knot directly on your mono. get it snug but do not tighten it yet, you’ll want to do that after setting the depth. Discard the plastic tube.

2. Next, thread a bead onto your line and then your slip bobber. If your bobber stop came with beads, use one. The bead is there to prevent your knot from slipping through the opening in the top of your bobber. It’s a rare case when the bead should not be used.

3. Next, thread a small 1/8 or 1/4-ounce egg sinker onto your line after your slip bobber. Then tie on your barrel swivel. The swivel acts as a stop for you egg sinker and can help with line twist when bringing in a fish. If you chose to use a split shot, instead of the egg sinker, it should be placed directly above your swivel, above the knot. don’t clamp down on your knot!

4. Now, all you need to complete your slip bobber rig is a leader and hook. For a leader, as stated before, you will want to be using about a 12-inch long fluorocarbon leader made of up to 8-lb test fluorocarbon. I personally won’t use anything heavier than 4-lb because of Round Valley’s crystal clear water and the fact that Trout are very line shy. As for hooks, I always use size #8 Gamakatsu Octupus Circle hooks since the purpose of those hooks is for use with live bait, and the way they’re points are angled they usually end up setting right in the corner of the fishes mouth when used properly making for easier hook removal and is better for catch and release. But if you don’t have any of those, a size #6 or #8 Gamakatsu Octopus or any regular bait-holder hook will work perfectly fine.

5. You should now have everything on your line in the proper order and all you need to do before you start fishing is set the depth of your bobber stop. The way I usually go about this is using my rod as a measuring tool. So if you know you have say a 5-foot long fishing rod and want to set your bait down 20-feet, you would just simply slide out line from your reel while measuring the length of the rod four times since you have a 5-foot rod and want to get down to 20-feet. After you’ve done that all you need to do is slide the bobber stop knot to the 20-foot mark, pull the tag ends tight this time, clip off the excess and you’re ready to fish with a slip bobber!

Round Valley Brown Trout
23.5-inch Brown Trout caught in September 2014 on a shiner under a slip bobber; my first Fall 2014 slip bobber catch!
Round Valley Brown Trout
23-inch Brown Trout that caught on a Shiner under a slip bobber in December 2013.
Round Valley Rainbow Trout
23-inch Rainbow Trout that fell to a Shiner under a slip bobber in December 2013.

Night Fishing Report

Night fishing report from Dave Quaglia and friends who went fishing at Round Valley Reservoir after the hot September sun had gone down. They caught two nice rainbows and a bunch of bluegill anchored in roughly 50 feet of water off the East beacon near the campsites. Corn and shrimp were the baits of choice. Notice the jacket, it’s getting cooler out there at night now that we are almost in October.

Dave Quaglia Rainbow Trout
Dave Quaglia holds one of two Rainbow Trout caught while night fishing at Round Valley.

Thanks for sharing the report Dave! Everyone can send in reports to robert@roundvalleyfishing.com

Round Valley Fishing Report – April 1, 2014

This past Tuesday, April 1, I was finally able to get out and fish from a boat on Round Valley for the first time in a few months, thanks to Mike Kalinchock from the Round Valley Trout Association (Thanks again Mike!).  We were mainly targeting Lake Trout by wire lining with Chartreuse and Perch pattern spoons.  Though we were also trolling two rods with small jointed Rapalas behind one color of lead-core off of planer boards, hoping to get into some of the big trophy Trout the RVTA stocked this past weekend.

Me with one of the Rainbow Trout I stocked at the RVTA Trophy Trout stocking this past Sunday (March 30).
Me with one of the Rainbow Trout I stocked at the RVTA Trophy Trout stocking this past Sunday (March 30).  Some true giants were put in this year, a few of which were almost 10-lbs!

Going into this trip I had never fished with wire line before, but Mike definitely knows what he’s doing and was able to show me the ropes for the day.  I can’t honestly say I was used to letting 100+ yards of line out by hand, but once I got into the rhythm of things it wasn’t bad at all.  We started out trolling on the South side of the reservoir between 70-90 feet of water for some Lakers, and soon enough we were into some fish that were taking our spoons off of the wireline rods.  On our first pass down the South side we picked up I believe two fish and missed a few more.  Then, on our second or third pass though the area, we finally got a solid hit on one of the planer boards which were set up to target some Rainbow and Brown Trout.  Mike quickly grabbed the rod and started reeling, and shortly after said he thought it was a tagged fish.  About half way through the fight, we thought it shook the hook, but luckily we were wrong and ended up landing a 24.5-inch, 5-lb Rainbow Trout.  Not only was Mike right about it being a tagged fish, but it also happened to be RVTA tag #553, last year’s RVTA money fish!

RVTA Trophy Rainbow
Mike K. with his 24.5-inch, 5-lb Rainbow Trout (Tag #553) caught trolling a silver jointed Rapala behind one color of lead-core.

After landing that fish, we made another pass or two down the South side of the reservoir without too many more strikes, so we decided to head up to the North side to see if we could do any better there. We only made one pass on the North side before calling it a day, but the Lakers were stacked pretty thick all over the bottom there in 70-80 feet of water, and we landed another one and missed a few more. Also, not to mention we passed over a ton of bait on the North side, the most I’ve ever seen on a fish finder at Round Valley.

Round Valley baitfish
Now that’s a lot of bait!

Then, right as we were just getting to the North tower, we got another hit on a planer board, and I landed a 16-inch Rainbow that took a small silver jointed Rapala fished behind one color of lead-core, just like Mike’s tagged Rainbow. Definitely was a nice change to get out and fish the Valley from a boat rather than shore fishing for once, and overall I was happy with the results. Between the three of us, we landed two Rainbows up to 5-lbs, four Lake Trout up to 3.2-lbs, and lost probably close to another 10 fish on the way up.

Round Valley Trout
Our catch for the day between the three of us. Two Rainbow Trout and four Lake Trout.

Not to mention Mike taught me a ton about not only wire lining, but trolling Round Valley in general. While I’m by no means an expert on trolling, I’ll be putting together a how-to trolling article in the near future with what I do know about that method of fishing. Until then, I hope everyone’s getting out and enjoying the spring weather now that it’s finally here, and tight lines!