Sun Burn and Lake Trout

Here is the author with a nice Lake Trout caught today.  Near the north tower in 85 feet of water drifting live Shiner.  Besides this fish, we caught bass and lots of sun burn… ouch.

RobsLakeTrout_7_2009

The trout was released and swam away nicely.

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10 thoughts on “Sun Burn and Lake Trout

  1. robert

    The weight is actually determined by the the drift and depth I want to fish at.

    If its windy I’ll put on anywhere from 1 to 2 ounces. If it’s not I’ll use 1/2 to 3/4 ounce.

  2. greg

    As the water cools down for fall do you still run the egg sinker/swivel/leader and herring set up..with just less wait?

  3. Robert

    Greg,

    Keep my cooler and anchors in the bow to weight it down a little. I’m no physicist but i know that the stern of the boat is wider and deeper than the rest so the added weight of the motor and fuel tank and all that needs to displace more water than the bow before it sits funny (like an overloaded pickup truck). I do notice that when i’m piloting the boat at full throttle when i’m alone the thing really goes fast and gets bouncy.

    I’ve never tried the tri-swivel sinker technique you described though I have heard of it also. The reason I have not tried it is because I want the least amount of stuff hanging near the bottom of the lake. You will come to find that there are lots of snags down there. This year alone I have brought up anchor ropes, fishing line, logs, branches, a coat of some kind… as well as the many times I just broke the line off because I couldn’t bring up whatever i was caught on.

  4. greg

    Here’s the fishing detail:

    Time: 7AM to 930AM

    Location: Mostly around boat launch cove and mostly up and down the left side. I did not get as far out as the tower. Next time I will venture out further.

    Target: I didn’t think this through enough…but I would like to catch trout…lake or rainbows and browns. I was too preoccupied with steering the boat, wondering about the wind, other boats, etc etc

    Weather: calm winds and water, a little overcast and temp approx mid 80?

    I have a medium action 6’6″ rod with 6lb test. I think I follow your description on the herring set ups…photos would be great too!

    I also read about a lake trout set up where you use a tri-swivel with a 3ft piece of line with a 1-2oz sinker to get deep, and the another 3ft piece of line that would trail a small Mepps (#0 or #1) or very light spoon (Sutton). The third ring on the swivel would obviously connect line to your rod. Have you ever tried that?

    You may be right about my boat and the weight. It was just me, tacckle box, small cooler with herring, trolling motor and battery. I did not not have my anchor in the boat (next time I will).

    When you run solo…does it seem like you are back heavy since you have the outboard, trolling motor, battery etc back there? I will be buying an outboard soon and will most likely run solo alot. Maybe the fuel tank in the center/front will help balance me out?

    Again…awesome web site Robert and thanks a ton for all the advice!

  5. Robert

    I have a deep v, so no. I feel safe in my boat. With no gas outboard, anchors?, livewell?, etc… you may be bouncing around due to lack of weight.

    As far as your tackle and rigs go. The common rod and reel setup on Round Valley is a medium weight 7 foot spinning rod with Line Capacity (Mono) – 8lb/240yds, 10lb/200yds (most 4000 series reels).

    Put a 1 ounce barrel sinker on your main line, then a barrel swivel, then a about 30inches of leader or 8lb test, then your #6hook. Hook the live herring in through the bottom of the chin and out the nostril. Are you trying to catch laketrout? You need to be on the bottom. Are you trying to catch rainbows? You need to be suspended in their thermocline. Are you trying to catch bass? You need to fish structures like weedlines, rocks, deadfalls, etc…

    If you are livelining (no weight), make sure you are in shallow water, like 15feet or less so that the fish will notice the herring.

    You didn’t mention where you tried fishing, what time of day it was, or what the weather was like. If you fill me in on that, I can probably give you better tips. I’ll post a few illustrations on rigs this week probably. Stay tuned.

  6. greg

    Just got home from my first ever try at Round Valley. It was also my first time out with my new boat(1961 Starcraft 14ft)running only my elec trolling motor. The launch was a little tricky solo, but I got it done.

    I tried the live herring – I think I must have been doing something wrong. I started with just a #6 hook, the herring, and no weight. I was either drifiting or on the slowest trolling speed, but the herring kept skimming the top of the water. I then tried adding a 1/2 oz weight about 2 ft above the bait – no luck.

    I switched over to a Rapala and trolled that at medium to slow speeds for about and hour – no luck.

    From reading…it seems like live herring is the way to go. What am I doing wrong with my rig??

    All in it was great to be out…beautiful place. I will admit however I felt vulnerable in the small boat. It’s 14 ft and the beam is only 52″.

    Rob…have you ever had close calls with your boat from wakes or swells due to wind?

  7. Robert

    The trout fishing has slowed to a crawl due to the hot weather. The key to fishing round valley for trout is locating a thermocline The trout enjoy. See my Fish page for a breakdown of temps the fish like.

    An easier (although not necessarily more productive) technique is to just fish the bottom in 70 to 85feet of water and drift. The laketrout always cruise the bottom. Use 1oz barrel sinker and live herring.

    The bass fishing is a better bet right now. Those fish are less affected by the heat. Fishing the entire perimeter of the lake live-lining herring or shiners will catch you smallmouth, largemouth, and rockbass. Don’t put anything on your line except a hook and hook your baitfish in through the lower jaw and out a nostril hole. Cast out and let the fish swim around for a while.

    Just because it’s hot out does not mean fish will not eat though so i encourage you to get out and have a fun day on the water.

  8. greg

    Aced the test and I’m now ready to roll. Is the fishing any good with all the hot weather we are getting? I would imagine finding the right depth is critical.

    See ya out there!

  9. Robert

    know what all the buoys and channel markers mean. Know what the navigation lights mean and how to pass.

    you can find all that on Google. Its really not that hard. Good Luck!

  10. greg

    Hey Rob,
    I just finished (and passed) my on-line boat safety test, and am scheduled to do the in person exam on Sunday. Is the in-person test similar in terms of length and difficulty? What should I expect?

    Still looking for a good used 9.9.

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